• Aman

Review: Morguk's Krushas - Universals

Updated: 7 days ago


Back with another card review and today we will be talking about the Universal objectives, gambits, and upgrades that come with Morgok's Krushas.


Note: As per my previous articles, I'll be using the following rating system.

A score of "A" means that the card is very powerful and should almost always be included in your deck builds. "B" means that the card is strong and will usually be included, but not always. A score of "C" means that card can be good in certain situations but will usually require extra support. Lastly, a score of "D" means the card is on the weaker side of things. It doesn't mean that it is inherently bad but perhaps can be considered hard to use or counter intuitive to your game plan.

Universal Objectives:

Change of Fortunes: Objective destruction/disruption has been very popular as late, especially in Hrothgorn's Mantrappers and Ylthari's Guardians decks. Cards like Scorched Earth, Leave Nothing to Chance, Abasoth's Unmaking are a part of this package and this card slots in perfectly. This is excellent for cards already using that strategy and for those warbands who may want to tap into this passive and useful strategy. Works wonders with Infestation and Coveted Spoils.

Rating: C


Feed the Beastgrave: I feel like we knew this was coming with all the flip tech that's been sprinkled in to a bunch of sets. With the full card release, we are seeing a lot of potential in enabling this alternate win condition. You're going to see a lot of people try decks that utilizing this strategy. I'm pretty pumped to try it myself. The challenge will be tip-toeing the line of ensuring you have enough objective destruction/disruption as well as ensuring that you can still play a deck that can fight your opponent while denying their strategy. Again, I really like this card and believe it can be a reliable game plan - you just have to build a very tight deck as the strategy is quite resource intensive.

Rating: C


Master of Battle: First thing to understand off the bat is that this card's requirements can be fulfilled via superactions as well. Warbands with very activation greedy characters like Mollog as well as characters with scything attacks will likes this. The fighters in Rippa's Snarlfangs are also excellent candidates for scoring this due to their snarlfang attacks. I also see this potentially being picked up by warbands with plenty of ranged fighters as well. Works with with with decks already taking Steady Assault.

Rating: B

Master Poisoner: Play two poison cards and get a single glory in the end phase is an interesting thought. The challenge is, the poison cards aren't that exciting in decks. If you want to use those cards, this can be a reliable end phase score for sure but I don't many people going for it. I won't be.

Rating: D


Meticulous Strategy: So by nature, glory multipliers are great cards. This one has potential for sure but the reliance on dual objective cards is challenging. With that being said, there are a lot of great dual cards out there like Swift Capture, Bold Conquest, Path to Victory, Team Effort, Uncontested, Brought to Bay, etc. I think it has merit, especially with Rippa's Snarlfangs who should be running Cruel Hunters. I may be rating it higher than it should be but since the aforementioned cards are popular enough, I think you might see this more often than you think.

Rating: B


Over my Bead Body: This is a close copy of Steadfast defender. If you are already running that card, and have multiple ways to get on guard, I think it's pretty useful. Otherwise, it's fairly average.

Rating: C

Show of Force: Now this is a very powerful card and I expect to be an auto-include in a ton of decks. If you're running an aggro warband (especially one with a high model count) or relying on a strategy that relies on stacking upgrades, then this is a fantastic card. I expect this to get restricted, honestly. It's very good for passive decks.

Rating: A


The Avatar Risen: Speaking of stacking upgrades, this card is bonkers. It is so much easier to score compared to other win conditions like it via The Scattered Tome and Acolyte of the Katophranes as it only requires 3 upgrades and ANY end phase. One of which is already in most decks: Sting of the Ur-Grub. In fact, I've seen people run this in conjunction with tome builds and it's been a nightmare to deal with as some warbands can easily make certain fighters un-killable. This is great for fighters that can come back too, like Spiteclaw's Swarm.

Rating: A


Trading Blows: A tough card to score given the lack of fighter reactions. I think it's great with Magore's Fiends and Steelheart's Champions though. Also, if you are running combo cards, this would definitely slot into your deck.

Rating: C

Universal Gambits:

Blind Hunger: I really like this card. It's an easy to cast spell, can inspire your warband (Stormsire's Cursebreakers and potentially Ylthari from Ylthari's Guardians should you roll a critical success). The potential card disruption is pretty nice to considering people only put "good" cards in their decks. Limiting your opponents potential options is great and the potential of hitting a restricted card is pretty juicy.

Rating: B


Bloodscent: I like that there is more universal accuracy options being added to the current card pool. While I think there are stronger options available, if your faction lacks these kind of cards, or the meta transitions to fighters with higher health pools, this could be a reliable pick.

Rating: C


Closing Jaws: Another edge hex ping but one with a hefty set of requirements. The challenge is that you have to telegraph this in advance which means your opponent can either move the targeted fighter or give them an upgrade to keep them alive. Not worth it for that reason.

Rating: D

Dulling Dart: It's an interesting concept and one that could work well given the right circumstances. Applying this to Mollog or Skaeth for example could be detrimental to your opponent's strategy. Still, I don't think it makes the cut unless you are focusing on some sort of poison strategy.

Rating: C


Go to Ground: This is a much weaker version of a beloved card from season 1, Illusory Fighter. The kicker is that you can only select a fighter with no move or charge tokens so what this means is that this is almost always going to be an escape tool. There are some instances in which you could bring a powerful fighter back in order to protect your backline, so there is merit here. Particularly, I think it is very powerful on Mollog considering he ignores the first move/charge token he gets. The options for being a quarry are nice and there a lot of tools available to trigger that result. If you can reliably set this up, this may be a powerful tool for your warband.

Rating: B


Headlong Flight: A back up option for Spectral Wings if your warband does contain any hunters and can reliably get the quarry keyword out there. As mentioned previously, there are a lot of good options out there now. If you have more than one hunter in your warband, then Tracking is superior. If you are really craving mobility, you can take this, Tracking, and Spectral Wings.

Rating: C

Punch-Drunk: So when you'd drive someone back, you can scatter the opponent 3 instead. While you can potentially further zone your opponent out here, it is unreliable. I preferring choosing where I drive back my foe.

Rating: D


Scavenged Defenses: If this was for the whole round, I would consider taking this card. However, since it is restricted to only the next activation, it's not worth the card slot.

Rating: D


The Ground Shifts: We now finally have the ability to move a lethal hex. While I think the concept is neat and it could potentially help you alleviate getting max offset against the Molten Shardpit board, I find it to be a very edge case card with a potential to be dead in your hand more often than not.

Rating: D

Universal Upgrades:

Abasoth's Auto-Immolation: So the mysterious wizard Abasoth is back but unfortunately this is one of his weaker tricks. On a 50/50 you can potentially deal 1-2 damage to your opponent upon the users demise. Eh. Also, it's probably the worst Lost Page upgrade in terms of utility.

Rating: D


Amberbone Sword: Finally, we get the sword! An attack action upgrade that hits for 3 smash for 2 damage is very accurate. Like all amberbone weapons, you get an extra glory point too for your troubles. I see this potentially replacing Nullstone Sword and Sword Breaker in a couple decks, especially the later. A great weapon and the art looks great!

Rating: A


Claws of the Ur-Grub: While I believe ensnare is more valuable than cleave nowadays, I do not think it is valuable as just an upgrade. The only reason you take this card is you are looking to get a payout for The Avatar Risen - then it is a must have. Otherwise, it is not a good card on its own.

Rating: D

Cursed Blade: A melee weapon that hits on 2 smash for 3 damage is quite potent. Getting a bump to your fighter's movement characteristic is great too. The caveat is that whenever you activate this fighter, they take a damage. Further more, if you start a round, you must active this fighter first - unless they eliminate themselves via the damage. I think it's great for warbands that want weapon caddy's like Spiteclaw's Swarm, Zarbag's Gitz, and The Grymwatch. Otherwise, it may cause you more harm than good.

Rating: C


Hunter's Will: If you are running a hunter strategy then this card is semi-redundant Duelist's Speed. While the aforementioned card is strictly better, this could see play in a warband with more than one hunter.

Rating: C


Prescient Blow: So while the range 1, 1 fury, 1 profile seems pitiful, this card can actually a massive pain for your opponent's melee fighters. Before they attack you, if they are adjacent to you, you can hit first. When you combine it with Duelist's Speed this will literally negate an opponent's charge as your fighter can step away after their attack reaction. It's a broken combination that either needs to be errata'd or forsaken asap. On its own, it is a subpar card however.

Rating: C

Soulward Shard: In a magic heavy meta, this could be a decent tech card. The problem is, wizards aren't as common, especially in some of the predicted top warbands. Cool interaction when it works though.

Rating: D


Strength of Terror: Getting an additional die on all attack actions seems well worth it for becoming a quarry. I expect this go into most decks, especially aggro ones. It might even finally bench Potion of Rage. Maybe.

Rating: A


Warding Companion: The defensive version of Helpful Whispers, this card has potential. If you are running a tome, lost page, or avatar build, this dramatically improves the survivability of your fighters, especially if they have more than 1 die on defense. I like it for aggro warbands to like Rippa's Snarlfangs and Skaeth's Wild Hunt. It can help keep your fighters alive to hopefully get another attack in, or two.

Rating: B

If you were iffy on whether or not you wanted to purchase Morgok's Krushas, then I hope this review has you committed to it. Some of the cards included here are a must if you are hoping to improve your current strategies and combat your opponent's new ones.

If you would like to pre-order Morgok's Krushas, head on down to your local Warhammer Store or gaming store. If you prefer to shop online, check this out here.


I hope you enjoy your experimenting with these cards over the coming weeks. Look out for more content coming out in regards to them over the next couple days.

Cheers,


Aman

©2018 by Hexes and Warbands. Proudly created with Wix.com